Social Sciences

9th Grade

413 Honors World History
Credit: 1 (weighted)
The course seeks to develop greater understanding of the evolution of global processes
and contacts in interaction with different types of human societies. This understanding
is advanced through a combination of selective factual knowledge and the development
of analytical skills. The course highlights the nature and changes in international
societal frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons
among major societies. The course builds on understanding cultural, institutional,
geographical and technological issues that have greatly influenced world history.
Students will also discuss varying interpretations of events by historians in working
toward an understanding of the processes involved in understanding history.

415 World History
Credit: 1
This course focuses on the development of man from prehistoric times to the rise of
modern imperialism. We begin with the evolution of man and the development of
civilizations. From there, we take a look at the different cultures of the world and
examine their impact on history. Finally, the last section of this course examines the
development of European history and how it has shaped the growth of the world. The
course ends with the students studying the effects of modern imperialism and how this
and other key events will lead to World War I.

10th Grade

425 U.S. Government
Credit: 1
A study of the structures that make up the government of the United States. Students
will study the triple levels of the government on the federal, state, and local levels. They
will also be able to identify these structures and evaluate the roles of the executive,
judicial, and legislative functions on all three levels. Students will gain valuable insight
into the role of their congressional and state representatives and how they can involve
themselves more fully in the political process. Students will study the historical
foundations of the Constitution from English Common Law through the Supreme Court
interpretations of John Marshall.

423 AP U.S. Government
Credit: 1 (weighted)
An in-depth study of the structures that make up the government of the United States.
Students will study the triple levels of government on the federal, state and local levels.
They will also be able to identify these structures, compare them to other systems
around the world, and evaluate the effective roles of executive, legislative and judicial
functions on all three levels. Students will gain experience in analyzing case studies,
civil rights issues, continuing controversies in this area of study and further exploration
in governmental structures and policy. The course is further outlined by the College
Board. In addition, the course covers an historical study of the foundations of
Constitutional Law from English Common Law through the interpretations of John
Marshall. The students will have the opportunity to take the national College Board
Examination for possible college credit at the conclusion of the course.\

11th Grade

431 AP United States History
Credit: 1 (weighted)
This course is an in-depth analysis of the history of the United States from 1828 through
the present. The course concentrates on the ability of the student to engage in
analytical discussion of course topics and helps the student realize the many layers that
comprise historical study: demographics, economics, politics, geography, social history,
sociology, and psychology. Study of American historians and their different outlooks
helps the students to see history from as objective a viewpoint as possible with an eye
to analyzing present situations and planning for the future. The course also includes
preparation for the international College Board examination given in May. Scoring well
on this exam allows the possibility of college credit for the course.

435 United States History
Credit: 1
The course begins in the 1820s and studies United States history until the present. The
course covers the following topics: Growth and Change (1790-1860), War and
Reunification (1820-1900), A Nation Transformed (1860-1910), A World Power (1897-
1920), Prosperity and Crisis (1919-1939), World Conflicts (1921-1960), A Changing
Home Front (1954-1978), and Modern Times (1968-Present).

12th Grade

Seniors are highly encouraged to pursue course selections from elective courses offered
by the Social Studies Department in order to meet the elective requirement for graduation.
Please see the course descriptions below.

Electives

441 AP European History
Credit: 1 (weighted)
The methodology for this course imitates that of the AP United States History courses
with the emphasis here being an in-depth look at the political, social, economic, and
religious constructs of European history from Medieval Kingdoms of the 11th century to
the fall of the Berlin Wall. The course also includes preparation for the College Board
Exam, for which scoring well allows for the possibility for college credit.

461 Sociology
Credit: 0.5
This course studies the interaction between the individual and his social group and
environment. It examines how society influences the individual and how the individual
can influence society.

463 Psychology
Credit: 0.5
This course is designed to increase students’ knowledge about themselves and others.
It develops an appreciation of the scientific method in the investigation of cause and
effect relationship in human behavior.

451 AP Psychology
Credit: 0.5 (weighted)
The purpose of AP Psychology is to introduce students to the systematic and scientific
study of the behavior and mental processes of human beings and other animals.
Students are exposed to the psychological facts, principles, and phenomena associated
with each of the major subfields within psychology. We will explore the history of
Psychology, biological basis of behavior, developmental psychology, the study of
consciousness, as well as a variety of other topics. Students will learn to apply the
basics of Psychology to investigate their own behavior, as well as the behavior of
others.

465 Current Affairs
Credit: 0.5
This elective course explores a wide variety of issues existing in the world today.
Among the topics discussed are: gun control, education, violence, alcohol and drug
issues, the media, censorship, race relations and the government. Newspapers and
weekly magazines are used as source materials and the student will be encouraged to
develop opinions and viewpoints through class participation and essay writing.

466 Current Affairs II
Credit: 0.5
This is a continuation of Current Affairs (465).

Geography 
Credit: 0.5
Why was the city of Cleveland settled in the location where we live today? What factors
helped people determine over 100 years ago that a settlement in our area could turn
into a prosperous city? What natural factors determine where people live, what people
do for a living, and how they interact with each other? A combination of social studies
and science come together to create the discipline of geography, a study of how human
interests and natural phenomena come together to shape human existence on earth.

AP Human Geography
Credit: 0.5 (weighted)
AP Human Geography is a semester course aimed at investigating the interaction
between physical and human geography that focuses on the distribution, processes,
and effects of human populations on the planet, Units of study will include population,
migration, culture, language, religion, ethnicity, political geography, economic
development, industry, agriculture, urban geography, as well as others. Students will
analyze case studies from around the globe, comparing them to each other, the United
States, and even our immediate area. Students should expect to read case-studies,
observe and discuss their own world, study current events, and utilize materials from
outside of the textbook.

467 Street Law
Credit: 0.5
This course will provide practical information and problem-solving opportunities for
students. The curriculum will survey the legal system including criminal law and
procedures as well as individual rights and liberties in the areas of speech, press,
assembly, religion and discrimination. Case studies, simulations, mock trials, and guest
speakers from the legal and law enforcement communities are among the class
activities.

469 Mock Trail
Credit: 0.5
Pre-requisite: Street Law
Mock Trial allows high school students to experience the courtroom in a hands-on
mode. The mock trials are set up and structured just like a real court, bound by the
same rules. This will help students know exactly what role each of the different people
in a court (judges, lawyers, witnesses, etc.) have in the justice system. Students in the
course are expected to participate in mock trial competitive activities in the Cleveland
area.

Business Courses

501 Marketing
Credit: 0.5
Marketing is one of the most important functions in the modern American company.
Companies spend billions of dollars each year in advertising and that is just one aspect
of the marketing pie. The course will cover how marketing impacts society, major
principles of marketing, marketing plans and strategies, legal issues, how to use market
research to form marketing strategy, and career options available in marketing.

504 Sports Marketing
Credit: 0.5
The field of sports and entertainment marketing is rapidly growing. Many colleges, universities, and high schools offer specializations in sports and entertainment marketing. In this course, students will explore the intriguing world of sports and entertainment from the perspective of marketing.  Through the management principles practiced by successful businesses in the sports and entertainment fields, Sports and Entertainment Marketing covers topics such as leadership, finance, product management, human resources, legal and ethical issues, managing change, and customer relations.

505 Economics
Credit: 0.5
Economics is a course dealing with making personal and social decisions. The course
covers the private and public sectors of the economy. The first semester deals with the
study of micro economics. The students will learn the theory of the law of supply and
demand. They will cover perfect competition, monopolistic competition, oligopoly, and
monopoly forms of business. The second semester deals with macroeconomics. The
student will learn how the whole economy functions. He will study distribution of income,
unemployment, inflation, monetary and fiscal policies.

507 Accounting
Credit: 1
This course provides the basic principles of accounting, how to open a set of financial
records, how to journalize, post, prepare financial statements and close records. This
basic accounting cycle will be expanded on as the course progresses so that the
student gains a general understanding of accounting principles. The course covers
additional material dealing with the maintenance of accounting records for a sole
proprietorship, partnership, and corporation. The students will use computers to solve
integrating automatic accounting topics. The student will be performing file maintenance
activities such as journalizing departmental purchases and cash payments.

509 Business Law
Credit: 0.5
This course aids the student in understanding and logically considering the principles of
law as outlined in the Uniform Commercial Code in business policies and practices.
Changes in the Code are illustrated in the course especially those dealing with
commercial paper, sales and secured transactions, social security insurance and labor
laws.

509 Criminal and Consumer Law
Credit: 0.5
This course will provide practical information and problem-solving opportunities for students. The curriculum will survey the legal system including criminal law and procedures as well as individual rights and liberties in the areas of speech, press, assembly, religion and discrimination. This course also aids the student in understanding and logically considering the principles of law as outlined in the Uniform Commercial Code in business policies and practices. Changes in the Code are illustrated in the course especially those dealing with commercial paper, sales and secured transactions, social security insurance and labor laws.
Case studies, simulations, mock trials, and guest speakers from the legal and law enforcement communities are among the class activities.

511 Consumer Finance
Credit: 0.5
Focuses on consumer finance and collection and deals with how individuals obtain
money and credit (cards, loans, stored-value, etc.). Also addresses the range of
creditor debt-collection activities, credit reporting, and credit scoring. The course also
explores the problems of common consumer scams, including the consequences of
non-payment. Included also is an exploration of the consumer ramifications of the
Equal Credit Opportunity Act, Truth-in-Lending Act, Fair Debt Collection Practices Act,
Fair Credit Billing Act, Fair Credit Reporting Act, Regulations Z and E, and the New
York Retail Installment Sales Act.

513 Micro Economics
Credit: 1
Students will study and practice entrepreneurship in a course that will introduce students
to the benefits and challenges of entrepreneurial experience, in a formal program that will
introduce students to entrepreneurs from the Benedictine and Cleveland communities. The class
will use the case study method to introduce students to core concepts of business planning including
opportunity recognition, financial modeling, financing, accounting principles, and marketing while
also exploring the importance of ethics in business.